Canadian Coat of Arms

  

The Imperial Crown

The Imperial Crown

This crown which sits atop the Royal Arms of Canada represents
the presence of a Monarch as Canada's Head of State. This
crown is St. Edward's crown. It has been used in the coronations
of Kings and Queens in Westminister Abbey for centuries.

The Crest

The Crest

The crest sits atop the royal helmet on the Coat of Arms. It is
used to mark Canada's sovereignty and consists of a lion standing
on a ring of red and white silk. The lion is wearing the royal crown
and holds a maple leaf in the right paw. The lion symbolizes valour
and courage.

The Shield

The Shield

The three lions in the first section represent the ties to England.
They date back to King Richard I, "The Lion-Hearted". During
the Crusades he carried a shield with three gold lions on a red
background. The second section contains the Royal Lion of
Scotland. A red lion is seen rearing up on it's left foot, in a red
double border with fleurs-de-lis on the corners and center. This
emblem was used by Alexander III who created the independent
nation of Scotland. The third section is the golden harp with white
strings which is the Royal Irish Harp of Tara. After his victory in
Ireland Henry VIII had the Pope send the Harp of Tara to
England where he had it's likeness emblazoned on his royal shield.
It remains the symbol of Ireland. On July 24, 1534, Jacques
Cartier landed at Gaspe, erected a cross and claimed Canada for
France. The fourth section is the symbol of the Royal Fleurs-de-lis
of France and was engraved in that cross. This represents the first
heraldic symbol raised in Canada. The three maple leafs are a
genuinely Canadian symbol and were put into the shield to ensure
that the Coat of Arms was unmistakably Canadian.

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